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James Wright

Doctoral Researcher, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

  • Hailing from Staffordshire, James has worked as a professional archaeologist throughout much of lowland England.
  • Following graduation from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham, he began his career in 2000 working for Trent & Peak Archaeology prior to retraining as a conservation stonemason under the master mason Mark Stafford with formal qualifications obtained from Weymouth College.
  • James then combined both disciplines as Archaeological and Historic Buildings Assistant at Nottinghamshire County Council between 2004-2010 where he ran the Castles of Nottinghamshire Project.
  • He then moved on to work as a buildings archaeologist and historic stone specialist for the Museum of London Archaeology until the autumn of 2016.
  • Wright returned to the University of Nottingham as a Doctoral Researcher funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council in a Collaborative Doctoral Award with the National Trust on Tattershall Castle, Lincolnshire.

Expertise Summary

  • James has worked in several areas of the heritage sector with experience as a field archaeologist, conservation stonemason, community archaeologist, historic stone specialist, archival researcher, historic graffiti specialist and buildings archaeologist.
  • He also has experience of working within development control in the planning system as well as working with historic environment records.
  • James is trained in the use of AutoCAD, GIS and 3D photo-modelling.
  • His principle interest is buildings archaeology and, in particular high status medieval structures.
  • He has led major projects at sites including the Tower of London, Palace of Westminster, Southwark Cathedral, Knole (Kent), King John's Palace (Nottinghamshire) and most recently Tattershall Castle (Lincolnshire).

Research Summary

Tattershall Castle in Lincolnshire is an iconic Grade I listed building that represents one of the very first uses of brick in the architecture of the medieval period. Originally constructed in the… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

  • Tattershall Castle in Lincolnshire is an iconic Grade I listed building that represents one of the very first uses of brick in the architecture of the medieval period. Originally constructed in the mid-thirteenth century, the castle was radically remodelled as a great house for Ralph Cromwell, Lord Treasurer of England, in the mid-fifteenth century.
  • Subsequently the site was owned by well-known historical individuals such as Margaret Beaufort and Charles Brandon. After falling into disrepair during the seventeenth century, the conservation of the castle was funded by Lord Curzon, in the early years of the twentieth century, prior to donation to the National Trust who currently manage the site.
  • Despite featuring widely in almost every major publication during the last hundred years on the medieval castle Tattershall has never been subjected to a detailed programme of historic building survey or archaeological landscape analysis. The next three years of Wright's doctoral research will interrogate this data.

Department of Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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