Nottingham ESRC Doctoral Training Centre
   
   
  
 

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Stephanie Sampson

PhD Student, School of Law,

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Biography

Stephanie received a BA (Hons) in Law and Media at De Montfort University in 2007, going on to study a masters in Public International Law at the University of Leicester and awarded with distinction in 2009. She worked as a research assistant with The Cochrane Collaboration's Schizophrenia Group at the University's of Nottingham Institute of Mental Health (IMH) between 2011-2014 writing systematic literature reviews and performing meta-analyses for treatment interventions for people with severe mental illnesses, in the field of evidence based medicine (EBM) and policy. During this time she was awarded the IMH/ Shanghai Mental Health Centre's Research Exchange Fellowship award, providing the opportunity to spend three months in China working with international colleagues and in updating and editing systematic reviews.

Stephanie was awarded an ESRC-funded award to undertake her PhD on the +4 Mental Health and Wellbeing Pathway, completing all relevant modules for a masters by research, with the intention of completing her thesis in the interdisciplinary areas of ethics, EBM, mental health law and medical practice.

Teaching Summary

Group facilitator with the University of Nottingham's annual Systematic Review Course (2012-present)

Research Summary

This PhD research focuses on the ethical and legal issues surrounding participation in scientific research, particularly those people who are subject to interventions in an environment where they may… read more

Current Research

This PhD research focuses on the ethical and legal issues surrounding participation in scientific research, particularly those people who are subject to interventions in an environment where they may not have the right to refuse treatment (as for those sectioned under the Mental Health Act). This will lie at the intersection of the three fields: legal-ethical, medical-ethical, and research-ethical. Questions as to how these approaches interact both theoretically and in practice regarding evaluation of treatments unique to situations of coercion has remained largely unstudied, with even much user-led research turned down by research ethics committees. In the face of a dearth of evidence, this work will explore how the legal and ethical regulation of medicine balances - or fails to balance - what is ethical as well as legal in this important area of evaluative research.

Nottingham ESRC Doctoral Training Centre

University Park
Nottingham
NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 748 4507
email: esrc-dtc@nottingham.ac.uk